Tag: Windows Server

HardwareInfrastructure

Windows Server running on ARM CPUs, Azure is Next!

So far the servers within Microsoft Azure data centers have been running Intel processors (CPUs). For a long time I’ve wondered if the power efficiency of ARM CPUs could make them more cost effective than Intel x64 CPUs that are more powerful. It’s possible through the use of parallel computing that distributing load across many more ARM CPU cores that consumer lower power could be more cost effective than distributing the same load across fewer more powerful Intel CPUs. Since I first came up with the idea, I’ve assumed that ARM would be more cost effective, however, I haven’t seen anything to back it up. With recent news about Microsoft exploring Windows Server running on ARM, and ARM based cloud server, it looks like they’re dedicating some serious money to this very research effort.

ARM has already revolutionized mobile devices and Internet of Things (IoT). Could the next step for ARM CPUs be to revolutionize the Cloud and server market? Read More

Open SourcePowerShell

PowerShell now Open Source AND Cross-Platform! Linux, macOS, Windows

Windows PowerShell the new Shell (first released in 2006) for Windows that provides the ability to implement Task Automation, and Configuration Management via a Command-Line Shell and PowerShell scripting language built on the .NET Framework. PowerShell is an extremely strong tool and has become a staple in managing various Windows systems from the OS to SharePoint to the cloud and Microsoft Azure. Today, Microsoft has officially released PowerShell cross-platform support via an Open Source project that supports Linux, macOS and Windows! Read More

InfrastructureMarketplace

Azure Marketplace: Windows Server 2016 Tech Preview

There are a large number of Virtual Machine (VM) images available within the Azure Marketplace that range from Windows Server, various Linux distributions, to the latest Windows Server 2016 Technical Preview 5 just released. Just login to the Azure Portal, search the Azure Marketplace for the VM image you need, and create it on your subscription. This is the easiest way to setup a VM that you can then remote into without needing to setup any hardware. Plus, when you’re done just delete it. Read More