Tag: Windows IoT

ArchitectureDevelopmentVideo

Webinar Recording: Introduction to Building IoT Solutions with Microsoft Azure

Here’s a webinar I hosted for Opsgility recently titled “Introduction to Building IoT Solutions with Microsoft Azure”. In this webinar, I provide an overview of building Internet of Things (IoT) solutions with Microsoft Azure. I discuss the different services within Azure IoT Suite for building IoT solutions, as well as general architecture patterns used to build manageable and maintainable IoT solutions in the cloud. In addition to all the amazing Azure cloud capabilities, it also covers the basics around IoT prototyping hardware using Raspberry Pi and Arduino hardware platforms, as well as using Visual Studio to build Windows 10 UWP apps that can run on the Windows 10 IoT Core operating system. Read More

Internet of Things

Setup Raspberry Pi with Windows 10 IoT Core

Windows 10 IoT Core is Microsoft’s version of the Windows 10 operating system being built to run Internet of Things (IoT) devices. There are a few hardware IoT devices that Windows 10 IoT Core supports and can run on. One of these devices is the Raspberry Pi; specifically the Raspberry Pi 2 and Raspberry Pi 3. This article lists out the steps necessary to load Windows 10 IoT Core onto a MicroSD Card that can be inserted into a Raspberry Pi to run Windows 10 IoT Core as the operating system.

Flash Windows 10 IoT Core to MicroSD Card

In order to boot Windows 10 IoT Core from a Raspberry Pi, you must first flash the Windows 10 IoT Core operating system to an SD Card that can be used to boot the Raspberry Pi from. To do this you need to use a Windows PC and the IoT Dashboard utility.

Step 1: Using a Windows PC, download and install the Windows 10 IoT Core Dashboard.

Step 2: Insert your Micro SD Card into your PC.

Note: Before you start, you’ll want to make sure you have an MicroSD Card that is supported by Windows 10 IoT Core. It’s important to be aware that NOT all MicroSD Cards are supported, with the primary restriction that they are at minimum a Class 10 SD Card.

Step 3: Run the IoT Dashboard app, and click on the “Set up a new device” button.

Step 4: Select the “Raspberry Pi 2 & 3” device type, and fill in the necessary configuration values, then accept the software license terms and click the “Download and install” button.

Something to note on the Wi-Fi Network Connection setting is that it will pull from the Wifi Profiles on your local PC. This means that you will be able to easily configure your device to connect to the same Wifi network your Windows PC is connected to once it boots up from the SD Card. You won’t need to plugin a display, keyboard, or mouse in order to configure anything, so long as you select the correct Wifi network.

Step 5: When prompted to erase the SD Card, you need to click Continue. Just make sure you are aware that this will essentially format the SD Card before copying the Windows 10 IoT Core image, so you will lose any data that’s existing on the SD Card.

Step 6: The tool will continue by downloading the latest release of Windows 10 IoT Core. This ensures that you always have the latest version that you’re flashing.

Step 7: After the download completes, the dism.exe command-line tool will then automatically kick off to flash the downloaded Windows 10 IoT Core image to the SD Card.

Step 8: Once the flashing is completed, the IoT Dashboard will show a message stating that “Your SD card is ready.”

Step 9: You can now safely remove the SD Card from your PC and plug it into the Raspberry Pi and power it on.

Connect to the Windows 10 Device Portal

One of the features of Windows 10 IoT Core that makes it easier to manage, especially with headless devices, is the Windows Device Portal. This is a web interface that is hosted on the Windows 10 IoT Core device by default. This interface allows you to perform some remote monitoring, configuration, and deployment options for Windows 10 IoT Core.

Step 1: Once you’ve booted up a device with Windows 10 IoT Core you can then use the “My devices” option of the IoT Dashboard to easily discover what Windows 10 IoT Core devices are connected to the network that your PC is connected to. To view some details about the specific device, you can double-click on the device in the list.

Step 10: On the info for the specific Windows 10 IoT Core device, you can click on the “Open Windows Device Portal in browser” link to open up a new browser window navigating to the Windows Device Portal for that device.

Step 11: When the browser opens up and connects to the Windows Device Portal, it’ll prompt you to login. The Username you need to use will be Administrator, and the Password will be the password you configured when you flashed Windows 10 IoT Core to the SD Card.

Step 12: Once authenticated, you will be logged in and able to access the Windows Device Portal.

Overall the tools from Microsoft, including the IoT Dashboard, are extremely easy to use. You don’t need to use any command-line tools or open any configuration files to install Windows 10 IoT Core to an SD Card. You can then simply insert the SD Card into your device and boot it up to get it running.

HardwareInternet of Things

Microsoft IoT Grove Kit for Raspberry Pi

MSIoTGroveKitBoxThe IoT hardware landscape is ever changing from the new Raspberry Pi 3 to various Arduino boards. One thing Raspberry Pi has offered that Arduino hasn’t been capable of is to run Windows IoT Core. Now, the add-on device market for Raspberry Pi with Windows IoT Core has remained somewhat limited, as Windows IoT Core is still fairly new. This has meant wiring up servos, sensors and other things has been difficult for the average developer. With the introduction of the new Microsoft IoT Grove Kit you can now easily plugin servos, sensors, etc. with a single plug that really stream lines the prototyping process! Read More

Internet of Things

MkeAzure Slides: Getting Started with IoT using Azure, Windows IoT and Raspberry Pi

On Aug 17, 2016 I gave a “Getting Started with IoT” talk at the Milwaukee Azure group. In my talk I covered the basics of IoT Messaging Architecture and Azure IoT Suite (specifically IoT Hub and Stream Analytics), along with other Azure services such as Service Bus Queus, DocumentDB, and Azure Functions. No, IoT solution is complete with out an actual hardware device, so I showed what’s necessary to get started with Windows IoT development on a Raspberry Pi 2/3 along with an Adafruit BME280 Temp/Humidity/Pressure sensor and an LED wired up to the device. Read More